An interesting COVID-19 Global Map

Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE)
at Johns Hopkins University (JHU)

https://gisanddata.maps.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/ Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University (JHU)

Anyway, unless the government is withholding information from the public to me the measures being taken against COVID-19 seems an overblown response. I probably have a higher probability of meeting my end in a auto accident on the way to the store this afternoon. Or dying from the more familiar flu. Only the passage of time will reveal if it is justified or if the cure is more damaging than the illness.

Still an interesting map about where and where not this virus is expanding. That reveals some mysterious anomalies.

Interestingly Johns Hopkins was at the forefront of strategy against the 1918 Great Influenza. Having only recently, at that time, surpassed the medical knowledge in Germany [ Read “The Great Influenza - the epic story of the deadliest plague in history” by John M. Barry. Many people were fine at breakfast and dead by dinner time]

A popular children’s rhyme at the time:

I have a little bird
It’s name is Enza
I left the window open
And in flew Enza.

People always seek a way to deal with stressful situations.

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COVID is a very serious problem in my State & County. The national - regional ECOM organization I am in has not been “activated” but has asked its members to begin submitting daily “County Status Reports” listing COVID cases to our State directors. I have noticed that the occurrence of new cases is not nearly as high as the recent “modeling” done in the UK predicted, possibly because last week the Governor issued some heavy restrictions on public gatherings and businesses. We’ve had to make a couple of quick shopping trips and see the shelves are bare of paper towels and toilet tissue. Thankfully we received our retirement checks and had made our normal big monthly shopping trip just before the real chaos began.

I got out last week but no fish sighted. This week we’ve had great weather all week but I’ve got a lot of yard and have been getting my initial springtime yard work done so in case I were to get sick there would not be several weeks of spring growth to deal with in addition to the initial cleanup from winter. I also prefer to fish on weekdays. There’s a lot of yard work left to do but I’ll have the highest priority-visibility stuff done tomorrow, which is Sunday.

The weather forecast is cloudy-with occasional showers beginning tomorrow night but the “year-round” rivers are at good levels now prior to warming temps and heavy snowmelt. The Solunar and AHPS CFS prediction tables look excellent for Monday so I will happily follow the Governor’s decree for self-isolation on a favorite trout stream.

The COVID modeling done in the UK predicted an exponential spread; being much more contagious than the flu, and a greater fatality rate without government intervention for isolation to help with suppression.
Significant new model of COVID-19 spread influences UK & US responses
IMHO, the government will have gotten it right if in hindsight people look back and think “that wasn’t so bad” and believe the government response was “overblown”.

Another virus has a huge lead, and a long history of similar numbers of deaths in previous years. Yet it doesn’t motivate the same severe restrictions. That’s why I wonder if “they” know something they’re keeping under wraps. Maybe it’s just the new unknown and therefore feared more or there’s some other motive for increasing the public’s fear.. In general I don’t much trust the “experts” in any field to get it right.

" While everyone is in a panic about the coronavirus (officially renamed COVID-19 by the World Health Organization), there’s an even deadlier virus many people are forgetting about: the flu.

Flu season is hitting its stride right now in the US. So far, the CDC has estimated (based on weekly influenza surveillance data) that at least 12,000 people have died from influenza between Oct. 1, 2019 through Feb. 1, 2020, and the number of deaths may be as high as 30,000."

[that’s only over 4 months] :thinking:

" So how do these numbers compare to flu deaths in previous years? So far, it looks like the 2019-2020 death toll won’t be as high as it was in the 2017-2018 season, when 61,000 deaths were linked to the virus. However, it could equal or surpass the 2018-2019 season’s 34,200 flu-related deaths."

"The fact that people are more concerned about COVID-19 than the flu virus is no surprise, says Dr. Adalja. “Anytime there is a new emerging infectious disease that is shrouded in mystery with a lot of unknowns, it captivates people in a way that a regular virus that people deal with on a yearly basis won’t,” he says. "

https://www.health.com/condition/cold-flu-sinus/how-many-people-die-of-the-flu-every-year

So yeah, hopefully after it’s over we’ll determine it was just the monster in the closet or under the bed. Never a huge threat after all. And we can do Sunday morning quarterbacking, be ticked off at the news media & politicians (we don’t much like them anyway) for the massive deaths of businesses. They will still claim the overreach stemmed the virus tide, whether it actually did or not. Thus far my 401k balance has only suffered a nasty bruise. I’d prefer it not collect any more. But even more I’d prefer COVID-19 (or the flu or anything else) doesn’t do me in , and I remain alive to spend whatever amount is left. :wink:

We’re inside one of the big red dots on the map and our retirement accounts have taken a hit also. I’m hoping we’ll stay healthy and still be living off of them for another 20 years or so. We’re doing well this year because of last year’s gains but we are hunkering down and postponing but hopefully not completely cancelling some plans we had made at the beginning of the year. We’re expecting a lean 2021 but if COVID doesn’t have the dire impact that was predicted, we pray the markets will rebound enough to allow us to take some action this year for easing the crunch we expect next year and will continue upwards for the long term.

Blessings and best of luck to all of you and yours.

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